Social Documents / The Ethics of Encounter Part 2

Dani Marti, Time is the fire in which we burn (2009), video still
11 Dec 2010 - 13 Mar 2011
Slide show: 
The Atlas Group, Hostage, The Bacher Tapes (English Version) (2001) video still
The Atlas Group, Hostage, The Bacher Tapes (English Version) (2001) video still
Artur Żmijewski, 80064 (2004), video still
François Bucher, Haute Surveillance (2007), video still
François Bucher, Haute Surveillance (2007), video still
François Bucher, Haute Surveillance (2007), video still
Dani Marti, Time is the fire in which we burn (2009), video still
Dani Marti, Time is the fire in which we burn (2009), video still
Dani Marti, Bacon’s Dog (2010), video still
Dani Marti, Bacon’s Dog (2010), video still
Daniel Rutter, Untitled 2004
The Ethics of Encounter, installation shot, 2011
The Ethics of Encounter, installation shot, 2011
The Ethics of Encounter, installation shot, 2011
The Ethics of Encounter, installation shot, 2011

The Atlas Group, François Bucher, Dani Marti, Artur Żmijewski

 

Focus Space: Daniel Rutter

When artists site their practice within the fabric of social relations, documentary modes often play a central role in mediating events and experiences. Though the resulting material often bears a close resemblance to ethnographic mapping, investigative journalism or even community work, in contrast to the strict ethical codes to which these disciplines adhere many of today's artists operate in somewhat murkier waters. Working outside - or even deliberately corrupting - accepted conventions and frameworks, the artists participating in this two-part exhibition find alternative means to engage with social realities in situations of war, sex and political urgency.

A series of three week-long presentations of documentary films that interrogate the operations and effects of power launched The Ethics of Encounter programme.  Returning to the format of a group exhibition, Part 2 includes photography and video works by five artists who place storytelling at the heart of their practice. Re-imagining the format of the first person interview, they move from the grainy hostage-tape aesthetic adopted by The Atlas Group to Dani Marti’s intimate post-coital portraits, creating captivating, and occasionally deeply disturbing, narratives.  Whether folding fact into fiction or constructing complex games and experiments, these reality driven practices produce new types of knowledge and challenge the coordinates by which we live. 

Exhibition Interpretation is available to view here

The Ethics of Encounter is part of Stills’ Social Documents series, a three-year programme of exhibitions, screenings, workshops and courses which explores artists’ fascination with documentary modes and processes. Curated by Kirsten Lloyd

Download curator Kirsten Lloyd's essay 'The Ethics of Encounter' published in Artpulse magazine, Summer 2011, here.

Associated Events 

Friday 10 December  Cockburn Street Christmas Party & Preview, 7 - 9pm

Thursday 13 January  Film Lounge event: Agnes Varda, 6.30pm

Thursday 20 January  Film Lounge preview event, 'Ethics, Nationalism and the Theatrics of Documentation', 6.30pm

Thursday 10 February  Dis[h]course with Dani Marti at Spoon, 6.30pm

Wednesday 16 February  Artist Talk & Screening: Dani Marti, 6.30pm

Wednesday 2 March  Artist talk & Screening: François Bucher, 6.30pm

Thursday 3 March  The Ethics of Encounter Research Workshop Roundtable, 6.00pm

Friday 4 March The Ethics of Encounter Research Workshop

 

Romantic Realism

Monday 8 November 2010 - Sunday 23 January 2011

The romantic impulse in ethnographic films is examined in a selection of historical films presented downstairs in Stills' Film Lounge. Moving image has long been used as part of the scientific description of individual peoples and cultures, recording rituals and relationships together with the spaces and practices of everyday life. What happens when the camera attempts to capture the exotic and the unfamiliar?

Ethics, Nationalism and the Theatrics of Documentation


Monday 24 January 2011 - Sunday 13 March 2011


Presenting the work of contemporary artists who have turned their attentions to issues of nationalism, migration and borders, this programme examines the ways in which documentary modes have been used to mediate ethical debates.   Curated by Harry Weeks and Nea Ehrlich.

Presented with generous support from The University of Edinburgh's History of Art Department, the Goethe Institut, Glasgow and New Media Scotland.

 

Social Documents Home

 

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Image credit: Dani Marti, Time is the fire in which we burn (2009), video still